June 22, 2010

Hackers, Fraudsters & Botnets: Tackling the Problem of Cyber Crime

Hackers, Fraudsters & Botnets

Roar’s submission to the Australian Government’s cyber crime inquiry proposed the development of a national system of certifiable skills standards. Roar also argued for broad-based digital literacy training to span cyber safety, e-security, and digital citizenship. Both points have been included in the inquiry’s recommendations for a nationally coordinated approach to consumer education tied to clear benchmarks (Rec 31), and the development of IT literacy training (Rec 34).

The report – Hackers, Fraudsters and Botnets: Tackling the Problem of Cyber Crime – is the result of a year-long inquiry into the problem of computer crime and online identity theft and fraud. The report, released last night (21 June) in Canberra, makes 34 recommendations aimed at improving Australia’s response to the growing problem of cyber crime.

Regarding Roar’s input, the report states, “To overcome these issues, some submitters advocated the development of a national system of certifiable skills standards to raise online security proficiency in all sections of the Australian community including in vocational institutions, workplaces and at home.

“ROAR Film Pty Ltd, the developer of DBCDE’s Budd:e Education Modules, proposed the establishment of a national Internet users’ licence. Operating largely as an online program, users would be required to gain certification of a prescribed skill level before being permitted to use the Internet in various institutional contexts such as a school or a private organisation. Recreational Internet users, such as home users, could voluntarily obtain such a user’s licence.

“ROAR submitted that there is an overlap between e-security, safety and citizenship, and the licence could extend beyond e-security to cyber safety and cyber citizenship issues such as intellectual property and online ethics.54 ROAR informed the Committee that it has developed e-security modules for a similar initiative in UK schools, where all state schools in London access online teaching resources, including on cyber security, through the London Grid for Learning (a closed broadband network)…” (pp. 218-219).

Roar has since developed these ideas further, and will pursue the arguments in Roar’s submission to the Australian Government’s Joint Select Committee on Cyber-Safety.

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